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Monday, October 13, 2008

Chapter 2: a little off.....

I met a client whose dog had a mild to moderate intermittent lameness of a front limb. The dog was young and otherwise healthy. After a week of strict rest (those were my instructions), the lameness persisted. A few vets had seen this dog already, taken radiographs, used anti-inflammatory medication, and had not found the exact source of the dog's lameness. Nor could I. When I recommended she see an orthopedic specialist (a surgeon - not for surgery but at least to try to achieve a diagnosis), the owner said that she had visited with a "pet psychic", had spoken to her dog (you heard me), and that the dog asked to see an acupuncturist (note that I strongly believe in acupuncture, especially when used in conjunction with western medicine and diagnostics).
Millions of people on the planet believe in psychic phenomena - this doesn't irk me. But when your dog is lame you bring him/her to the vet, not to a psychic. In any case, shouldn't this psychic have predicted this dog's injury and prevented it?
I feel that imparting your own beliefs onto your dog is irresponsible, and potentially dangerous. A diagnosis can be missed if you're seeking help from people who have no business giving out medical/veterinary information. Trust your vet. This is exactly what we were trained for: not to be pill-pushers but to try to achieve diagnoses and institute appropriate treatments. And who knows? maybe the surgeon would have recommended acupuncture....

If your child were suddenly limping, would you take him/her to the ER or to a psychic?
Puh-lease people, enough.


At least she knows what he wants.

2 comments:

Mel said...

We acquired a blood donor cat several years back because the owner had contracted Bartonella and her acupuncturist/psychic healer told her that he, of her two cats, was the culprit and should be euthanized. She was convinced, instead, to surrender him, and he was a clinic cat for years until he developed diabetes. Now one of our techs has him and, insulin-dependency aside, he's a pretty happy 13-year-old.

TorontoVet said...

I'm in utter awe that this ridiculous practice is so pervasive.